Narnian Apologetics

C.S. Lewis was a master apologist. Good apologists recognize that often their task is simply to extend plausibility structures rather than entirely prove their case.

A plausibility structure is the set of ideas of that a person is willing to entertain as possibly true. It is largely a function of the beliefs a person already has.

Lewis demonstrates how to do this in his dialog between the Professor, Susan and Peter in his blockbuster book (now turned movie), The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.

I describe the entire dialog in my blog post called Narnian Apologetics.

What I like so much about this conversation is how the Professor, in a gentle but skillful manner, stretches the plausibility structures of Peter and Susan. He does it using the Columbo tactic of asking good questions.

It is an excellent example of conversational apologetics. Who said The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is a children's book anyway?

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