My Listmania Lists at Amazon.com

One feature I have always enjoyed at Amazon is the Listmania Lists that users create. Basically, Amazon allows users to create lists from 3 - 25 of books about a specific topic, with up to 200 words of commentary on each. They pop up on the right side of the screen depending on the search you do or the book you examine. I've found many excellent books that otherwise might have escaped my notice from them.

Over the last few days I have spent some quality time at Amazon putting together my own Lists. I hope that people who share my interests will find some of my recommendations and comments useful. It's a favor others have done for me and I hope I can return it. Some of the lists are more complete and thorough than others. A few are works in progress.

You can access a specific list by clicking on it:

1. Helpful Books About The Gospel of Luke

2.
A Christian Lawyer's Favorite Books About Culture and Law

3.
God and Science

4.
The Best Books About the Acts of the Apostles

5.
New Testament Introductions

6.
Is the Old Testament Reliable?

7.
The Historical Resurrection of Jesus

8. After the New Testament: Early Christianity


9. New Testament History

10. The Background of the New Testament

11. A Christian Lawyer's Favorite Books on Military History

12. The Best Historical Fiction

13. Cultural Apologetics

14. Christology

15. Historical Apologetics

16. General Books About the Study of History

17. Modern Christianity and its Future

18. Top Books on Paul the Apostle

Or you can access my Amazon bio and full list of lists here.

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